Multiple Photo Phriday – The secret life of Elgin Park

You’ve got to see these pictures. I really don’t see how he – Michael Paul Smith, does it but it is just amazing. This comes courtesy of the website, hovercraftdoggy.

hovercraftdoggy

Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.  Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.  Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.             Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.

Welcome to the City of Elgin Park.

Michael Paul Smith is the perfect example of an artist with a passion for what he does. For the last 25 years, he has spent some of his spare and much of his professional time making miniature models and photographing them, creating a gallery of vintage car photographs from a fictional 1950s American town called Elgin Park.

As a professional model maker, Smith’s models are detailed enough to withstand the scrutiny of close-up photography. Smith places them in miniature dioramas and uses forced perspective to make parts of the real world lend his pictures additional realism. The result is a quirky sort of historical fiction – faithfully and authentically reproduced scenes from a small American town that never actually happened (but could have).

What’s also great about his Elgin Park collection is that the magician is willing to…

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We got new make up

Just had to share this. Very cool stuff Klaus. I like the pink lady and the pumpkin skull the best. Thanks for sharing, hovercraftdoggy!

hovercraftdoggy

The Arcimboldo Series / by artist & photographer Klaus Enrique.      Words from the author: I had been working on a photography series in which I surround an isolated human body part with a large quantity of a certain object, when I was struck by the idea for this project. While I was photographing a human eye that was peeking out amongst hundreds of leaves, it occurred to me that I could actually utilize leaves to construct portraits or masks. I researched what other artists had created along these lines and discovered that, as usual, someone somewhere had already done something similar. In this case it was the artist Giuseppe Arcimboldo, who made paintings with this concept in mind over 400 years ago.The Arcimboldo Series / by artist & photographer Klaus Enrique.      Words from the author: I had been working on a photography series in which I surround an isolated human body part with a large quantity of a certain object, when I was struck by the idea for this project. While I was photographing a human eye that was peeking out amongst hundreds of leaves, it occurred to me that I could actually utilize leaves to construct portraits or masks. I researched what other artists had created along these lines and discovered that, as usual, someone somewhere had already done something similar. In this case it was the artist Giuseppe Arcimboldo, who made paintings with this concept in mind over 400 years ago.The Arcimboldo Series / by artist & photographer Klaus Enrique.      Words from the author: I had been working on a photography series in which I surround an isolated human body part with a large quantity of a certain object, when I was struck by the idea for this project. While I was photographing a human eye that was peeking out amongst hundreds of leaves, it occurred to me that I could actually utilize leaves to construct portraits or masks. I researched what other artists had created along these lines and discovered that, as usual, someone somewhere had already done something similar. In this case it was the artist Giuseppe Arcimboldo, who made paintings with this concept in mind over 400 years ago.The Arcimboldo Series / by artist & photographer Klaus Enrique.      Words from the author: I had been working on a photography series in which I surround an isolated human body part with a large quantity of a certain object, when I was struck by the idea for this project. While I was photographing a human eye that was peeking out amongst hundreds of leaves, it occurred to me that I could actually utilize leaves to construct portraits or masks. I researched what other artists had created along these lines and discovered that, as usual, someone somewhere had already done something similar. In this case it was the artist Giuseppe Arcimboldo, who made paintings with this concept in mind over 400 years ago.The Arcimboldo Series / by artist & photographer Klaus Enrique.      Words from the author: I had been working on a photography series in which I surround an isolated human body part with a large quantity of a certain object, when I was struck by the idea for this project. While I was photographing a human eye that was peeking out amongst hundreds of leaves, it occurred to me that I could actually utilize leaves to construct portraits or masks. I researched what other artists had created along these lines and discovered that, as usual, someone somewhere had already done something similar. In this case it was the artist Giuseppe Arcimboldo, who made paintings with this concept in mind over 400 years ago.The Arcimboldo Series / by artist & photographer Klaus Enrique.      Words from the author: I had been working on a photography series in which I surround an isolated human body part with a large quantity of a certain object, when I was struck by the idea for this project. While I was photographing a human eye that was peeking out amongst hundreds of leaves, it occurred to me that I could actually utilize leaves to construct portraits or masks. I researched what other artists had created along these lines and discovered that, as usual, someone somewhere had already done something similar. In this case it was the artist Giuseppe Arcimboldo, who made paintings with this concept in mind over 400 years ago.Klaus_Enrique_Primavera-530x700

The Arcimboldo Series / by artist & photographer Klaus Enrique.

Words from the author: I had been working on a photography series in which I surround an isolated human body part with a large quantity of a certain object, when I was struck by the idea for this project. While I was photographing a human eye that was peeking out amongst hundreds of leaves, it occurred to me that I could actually utilize leaves to construct portraits or masks. I researched what other artists had created along these lines and discovered that, as usual, someone somewhere had already done something similar. In this case it was the artist Giuseppe Arcimboldo, who made paintings with this concept in mind over 400 years ago.

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Published in: on December 14, 2013 at 11:26am12  Leave a Comment  
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Photo Phriday

I never knew this place existed. Isn’t it lovely? It’s a national park in the US.

from Hovercraftdoggy blog

T from Hovercraftdoggy blog

This was taken by Justin Brauner at Zion National Park in Utah. Now I have a new place to add to my must visit list. I think that road along the creek would be the way to go.

The Ebb and Flow of Life

Jennifer McLean

Jennifer McLean

This bit was sent to me by a woman by the name of Jennifer McLean. She has a program call Healing with the Master. It’s a free thing where she offers one hour discussions with spiritual/transcendent/enlightened folks of our time. Sometimes the offerings are…well lets just be polite and say…Different! Sometimes these folks can offer some wonderful insights. This note from Jennifer is one of those times.

 
I thought I’d send this little note and process to you today to remind you that we all share this juicy adventure of life and its peaks and valleys…
 
When we are feeling “low,” we often perceive that we are in a “low” place. But, by remembering that we are just in a different place of vibrational energy, we can love ourselves and accept where we are, knowing that this space of compression is preparing us for our next point of expansion.
Think of how a beautiful ocean wave rolls in and splashes us then recedes as we adjust. The space between waves is our time to adjust for the next and the next and the next, and each differs in pace, strength, and frequency.
If/when you are feeling low, use this following process to raise your vibration and accept the place in which you are:
 
Open your arms and stretch them apart, above your head, towards the sky as if you’re embracing and saluting the sun. Notice how your chest widens and feel that stretch in your back as your shoulder blades roll down and your chest opens up.  
 
Breathe in this place of expansion. Can you feel it?  Feel this expansion. 
 
Imagine holding that for 12 straight hours. It would hurt… because we are not meant to hold expansion forever.
 
Now slowly bring it all the way in and then move into a kind of fetal position where your head is tucked under, your palms are hugging you, your arms are hugging you. Doesn’t it feel safe in this fetal position?
 
Breathe in this place of compression. Can you feel it? Feel this place of compression.
 
Compression is a sign for a child to be born. Compression is winter.  None of it is bad or wrong…  It’s just compression.
  
Expansion and compression are the dance of life… Take it to its fullest point and then bring it in to that point of compression. And then expand as if your wings are expanding.
 
When a bird isn’t flying, it’s wings are not spread. It would hurt.  When you’re flying, your wings are spread.  When you’re not, you’re resting.  Resting.
  
So you get to choose if that point of rest is bad. Maybe it’s not. Maybe it’s just a point of inertia. Maybe you’re just supposed to rest. Maybe you’re supposed to be in the void. Maybe you’re not depressed. Maybe you’re just in a place of inertia.
 
Remember that the frequency and pace of things coming at us is all perfect because we are ready for it and can handle it.
 
It may be different than before, but we are in a place of energetic vibration that is completely enabling us to not only handle and manage it, but ride on it. And I know this is true because none of it would be here if we weren’t ready.
 
So, will you ride the wave of life and expand your evolutionary track?
 
In love, light and laughter,

Jennifer McLean

CEO McLean MasterWorks

Host, Healing With The Masters

Author, Healer, Entrepreneur

support@mcleanmasterworks.com

by Matt Molloy from hovercraftdoggy

by Matt Molloy from hovercraftdoggy

Photo Phriday

sky-photography, matt molloy, hovercraftdoggyThis is time lapse photography by Matt Molloy via hovercraftdoggy. If you click on the hovercraft link, you can see more of the same. But I like this one best – the color is wonderful.

Photo Friday for Dog Lovers

For you dog lovers out there.

compliment of hovercraftdoggy

compliment of hovercraftdoggy

I thought this was a very smart design. Too modern for my taste but still smart!

Photo Phriday

photo by Roos Aldershoff courtesy of hovercraftdoggy

photo by Roos Aldershoff courtesy of hovercraftdoggy

At first I thought this was a Photoshop picture, but it is not. It is a bookstore inside a 13th century Dominican church in Maastricht, Netherlands.

I like it if they did this to save/restore the building, rather than tear it down, but I don’t like the new architectural style within the old. It seems like it was just plunked into the building – oil and water sort of thing. And a commercial building inside a church somehow just doesn’t seem right to me. But again, if they did it to save the old structure, I’m willing to let it slide. (I’m sure the owners would be so glad to know that!) But they need to fire that interior designer.

Photo Friday

First Contact by Christopher Wright

I really like this image and the title the photographer gave it. It just fits.

I would envision a conversation between these two going something like this:

After a long pause, young girl touches the glass, the manatee raises and “arm” slightly  in response. The girl smiles.

“Hi!”

“Hello”

“What’s your name?”

There is a pause

“Name? Let me think on that a moment.”

Another pause

“Let’s go with Mika.”

“I’m Mary.”

Another pause

“Are you a girl or a boy?”

“I’m a girl.”

With a big smile, “Me too!”

Girl hears her name in the distance. She looks around to see where it’s coming from.

“I gotta go. My mommy wants me.”

Mary touches the glass.

“Bye, bye!”

Mika lifts an arm.

“Bye.”

(This photo was taken from hovercraftdoggy.com)