Words Bubbling Up

The meaning and symbolism of the word - «Bubble»

Do you have some words bubbling up inside you, just waiting to get out? 

We have all been hunkering down from this virus, from unrest, from…

NPR is giving us an outlet. 

Even if you don’t consider yourself a writer, I know you have words you can use to describe how you’re feeling. Write them down and send them to NPR and Kwame Alexander, Morning Editing’s resident poet – yes the show has it’s own poet, who knew? – will pick out words from our entries and create a poem for us!

The NPR piece and info on how to enter is here: https://www.npr.org/2021/01/18/956827920/poetry-challenge-honor-mlk-by-describing-how-you-dream-a-world

Here is the except from the Langston Hughes poem “I Dream a World”

I DREAM A WORLD WHERE MAN
NO OTHER MAN WILL SCORN,
WHERE LOVE WILL BLESS THE EARTH
AND PEACE ITS PATHS ADORN
I DREAM A WORLD WHERE ALL
WILL KNOW SWEET FREEDOM’S WAY,
WHERE GREED NO LONGER SAPS THE SOUL
NOR AVARICE BLIGHTS OUR DAY.
A WORLD I DREAM WHERE BLACK OR WHITE,
WHATEVER RACE YOU BE,
WILL SHARE THE BOUNTIES OF THE EARTH
AND EVERY MAN IS FREE,
WHERE WRETCHEDNESS WILL HANG ITS HEAD
AND JOY, LIKE A PEARL,
ATTENDS THE NEEDS OF ALL MANKIND-
OF SUCH I DREAM, MY WORLD!

 

image from weknowyourdream.com

Happy Birthday, Elizabeth

“What is genius but the power of expressing a new individuality.”

——

“Light tomorrow with today.”

——

“…Love me with they thinking soul,

Break it to love-sighing;

Love me with thy thoughts that roll

On through living-dying

Love me in they gorgeous airs,

When the world has crowned thee;

Love me, kneeling at thy prayers,

With the angels round thee.

Love me pure, as musers do,

Up the woodlands shady:

Love me gaily, fast and true,

As a winsome lady…

Not sure yet, which Elizabeth I’m quoting from?

How about this one?

“…How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.

I love thee to the dept and breadth and height

My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight

For the ends of Being and ideal Grace…”

Ah, yes. That Elizabeth.

Elizabeth Barrett Browning, born March 6th, 1806, Kelloe, Durham, England. Died June 29, 1861 (55 years) in Florence, Italy. Apparently she was a literary prodigy  She was reading novels and writing poems by age eight . She married Robert Browning in 1846 and they moved to Florence. They had one child –Robert Wiedemann Barrett Browning – or affectionately called, Pen.

From Wikipedia

From Wikipedia. Elizabeth with her son, Pen

If you didn’t know

It’s Elizabeth’s Birthday today

It’s Elizabeth Barret Browning’s Birthday today.

She was born in 1806 in England. She was the eldest of 12 children and went by the nickname “Ba”. Before she married her full name was Elizabeth Barrett Moulton Barrett. (Her father was Edward Barrett Moulton Barrett, her mother, Mary Graham Clarke). Apparently the family was very well off, mainly from land and business they owned in Jamaica. As a teen Elizabeth developed a painful disease that was never successfully diagnosed. She was put on addictive opiate drugs and morphine, which she became dependent on. I’m sure there was little else to do in the early 1800’s!

She married Robert Browning in secret in 1846 because she knew her father would not approve, and they moved to Italy, where despite her age (43) and frailty, she had a son (shown in the picture).

Elizabeth with her son Pen (Robert)

Here are a few quotes from Elizabeth that I particularly like:

“No man can be called friendless who has God and the companionship of good books.”

* * *

“Earth’s crammed with heaven,
And every common bush afire with God,
But only he who sees takes off his shoes;
The rest sit round and pluck blackberries.”

* * *

“With stammering lips and insufficient sound I strive and struggle to deliver right the music of my nature.”

* * *

“The little cares that fretted me,
I lost them yesterday
Among the fields above the sea,
Among the winds at play.”

Layers of Moments by Kimberly Blanchette

I was pleased to participate in the annual Sterling North Book Festival a couple of weeks ago. I wasn’t a guest speaker (what were they thinking?) but I was selling my books at their book sale. The Sterling North Book Festival is one of the few book festival left in Wisconsin, so I like to show up there to support it. Plus, I always like to go where readers are. I hadn’t sold my book in this type of environment for about a year, and I forgot how much fun it is to talk to people who like to read, and especially people who like to read historic fiction, which is what I really enjoy to write and talk about (www.ckbookspublishing.com). It’s also interesting to visit with other authors. One of those authors I visited with was someone who I had met at this same book festival a few years ago. We had talked in the past, but this time we made an additional connection.  I suggested we swap books and give each other a review. She was really up for it, which is great. You would be surprised how hard it is to get someone to review a book, even if they tell you how much they loved it. Taking that next step to write a review is hard. I don’t think people really understand how much it means to all authors, especially us independent authors.

So here I go. This is a review of Kimberly Blanchette’s book Layers of Moments.I always stop at Kimberly’s book table because she has a wonderful display of her photographs. They always draw me in. Many of the pictures look like they are taken out west – the Dakota’s, Wyoming area – and I really enjoy the expansive simplicity of this area. So now I had her book in my hand, and I got to read her poetry as well. The first poem I read was the last one, and I think it might be my favorite. Here it is:

The Conversation

The Chirp

Of

The Meadow Cricket

Is The Conversation

To Which There

Are

Only Two participants-

Me

And 

The Voice

Of

The Divine

Speaking

Through

All

Of 

Nature-

The Questions

I Need Answered

Are Painted

In The Sky

Formed

In The Clouds

Can You See Them? 

This poem is accompanied by a black and white picture of a cloud filled sky. All the pictures in this book are black and white. To be honest, I think her photography has improved over time. This book was printed in 2006 and many of the pictures seemed a bit dark and not as crisp as I like for black and white photos, but maybe that had something to do with the printing process. The photos I saw on her sale table a couple weeks ago where more dynamic and had that sharp crispness I like with black and white photograph . From Kimberly’s website it looks like she’s printed a new book of poems and photos called Naked, but she didn’t have that book at the festival so I can’t tell you about it. What I would recommend to Kimberly is when she does a reprint of Layers of Moments, redo the photos or get a different printer (what ever the issue is), I don’t think they represent the skill she obviously has with the camera. The poems are nice just as they are!