Publisher cancels Milo Yiannopoulos book ‘Dangerous’

CKBooks Publishing

Don’t know if you saw this interesting bit of news, but since we were discussing Milo’s book earlier, I thought you might like to know.

And who said your voice doesn’t matter?

Though he’ll either self-publish or find someone else who will publish it for him, I’m sure. It was ranked 83 on Amazon’s overall book list, after all.

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NEW YORK (AP) — Right-wing provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos’ publisher has cancelled his planned book, “Dangerous.”

Source: Publisher cancels Milo Yiannopoulos book ‘Dangerous’

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Published in: on February 21, 2017 at 11:26pm02  Comments (2)  

Rock Paper Scissor Book Author Interview – A Lizzy Ballard Thriller

Matty is an author I know so I wanted to share her latest book with you. I haven’t read it yet myself, but it’s on my list!

What is the underlying theme of Rock Paper Scissors?

The underlying theme of all my books is how a person with an extraordinary ability deals with that ability in the context of the ordinary world. In the Ann Kinnear Suspense Novels, The Sense of Death and The Sense of Reckoning, it’s Ann’s ability to sense spirits, an ability that sets her apart from other people, and causes the end of an important relationship. In Rock Paper Scissors, the first of the Lizzy Ballard Thrillers, it’s Lizzy’s ability to cause strokes in others, an ability that forces her to live in isolation, for the safety of others as well as herself.

Since Rock Paper Scissors is billed as a thriller, I suspect that Lizzy’s ability results in some mayhem!

Yes! The people who are responsible for Lizzy’s ability, and who are scheming to use it to further their own goals, are Gerard Bonnay, the head of a Philadelphia fertility clinic, and his wife and head of research, Louise Mortensen. During the course of the story, they acquire an unexpected ally, and Lizzy’s situation becomes even more perilous.

Does Lizzy have any allies to help her deal with the challenges her ability poses, and with the people who are trying to take advantage of it?

Initially, Lizzy’s primary allies are her parents, Charlotte and Patrick. The novel begins with Lizzy as an infant, and describes some incidents when she is a toddler and young girl to illustrate the dangers of her situation. However, most of the action of the story takes place when Lizzy is a teenager, and is triggered by a trip she wants to take from her home in the Philadelphia suburbs to New York City to see the sights at Christmas-time. At that point, it appears her closest allies are Owen McNally, a neurobiologist and friend of her father, and her family’s housekeeper, Ruby DiMano. But is Ruby really an ally? It’s clear that Ruby’s loyalties are torn, but it’s unclear which way she will ultimately throw her support.

You mentioned that Lizzy lives near Philadelphia—is that the main setting for the story?

As with The Sense of Death and the beginning of The Sense of Reckoning, most of Rock Paper Scissors is set in the Philadelphia area, near my home in Chester County, Pennsylvania. The Ballards initially live in Paoli, Pennsylvania, and as their fortunes decline, they move further out along the Main Line, which is the name given to the towns along the rail line that stretches west from Philadelphia. Lizzy and her mother also spend some time at the family cabin in the Pocono Mountains, a couple of miles to the north of Philadelphia. There’s also a critical meeting that takes place in Longwood Gardens, which is one of my favorite spots in Chester County. Patrick Ballard and Owen McNally work at William Penn University, which is my stand-in for my alma mater, the University of Pennsylvania, and Lizzy hides out for a time in a slightly fictionalized version of the Spruce Lane Lodge and Cottages in Smoketown, Pennsylvania, in Lancaster County.

How do you decide when to use a place’s real name and when to change it?

I change it when I want to reserve the right to adjust factual details to meet the needs of the story. I may also change the name if I may be portraying the place in a negative light. For example, early in the writing of Rock Paper Scissors, I thought the villain might be affiliated with the university, so I didn’t want to refer to it as the University of Pennsylvania. Similarly, I changed the real Philadelphia Inquirer into the Philadelphia Chronicle because I wanted to reserve the right to have one of its reporters engage in some less than ethical reporting.

Even though I’m tweaking the facts to support the story, I feel I’ve still been able to create a consistent world that runs through the books and across the series. For example, Lincoln Abbott, a reporter at the Chronicle who first appeared in The Sense of Death, pens several newspaper articles that appear in Rock Paper Scissors. Also, readers who are familiar with the Ann Kinnear Suspense Novels will be pleased to hear that Detective Joe Booth makes a brief appearance in Rock Paper Scissors.

What are you working on next?

I just started work on Lizzy Ballard Book 2. Book 1 ends in Sedona, Arizona, and my husband and I were just there for our yearly getaway from the Pennsylvania winter. Book 2 will start in Sedona, so I wanted to get started on that while I was still under the influence of the Sedona vibe. I also just finished my first Ann Kinnear short story, which I plan to make available to subscribers of my newsletter.

Where can people connect with you to sign up for your newsletter or to keep track of Ann Kinnear and Lizzy Ballard’s next adventures?

They can sign up for my newsletter at my website, mattydalrymple.com. For more frequent updates, they can connect with me on Facebook or Twitter.

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Matty Dalrymple is the author of the Ann Kinnear Suspense Novels, “The Sense of Death” and “The Sense of Reckoning,” and “Rock Paper Scissors: A Lizzy Ballard Thriller,” which launches in March 2017. She lives with her husband, Wade Walton, and their dogs in Chester County, Pennsylvania, which is the setting for much of the action in “The Sense of Death” and “Rock Paper Scissors.” In the summer, they enjoy vacationing on Mt. Desert Island, Maine, where “The Sense of Reckoning” takes place. Matty also blogs, podcasts, and speaks about independent publishing as The Indy Author.

Matty is a member of International Thriller Writers, Mystery Writers of America, Sisters in Crime, and the Brandywine Valley Writers Group.

You can purchase Matty’s book on Amazon.

Published in: on February 17, 2017 at 11:26pm02  Leave a Comment  
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Thrice the Binded Cat Hath Mew’d – Alan Bradley

My daughter bought this and she shared it with me once she was done with it.

StatThrice the Brinded Cat Hath Mew'd (Flavia de Luce, #8)s: published in 2016, hardcover is smaller than most hardcover, it’s 331 pages.

Blurb: (Goodreads) In spite of being ejected from Miss Bodycote’s Female Academy in Canada, twelve-year-old Flavia de Luce is excited to be sailing home to England. But instead of a joyous homecoming, she is greeted on the docks with unfortunate news: Her father has fallen ill, and a hospital visit will have to wait while he rests. But with Flavia’s blasted sisters and insufferable cousin underfoot, Buckshaw now seems both too empty—and not empty enough. Only too eager to run an errand for the vicar’s wife, Flavia hops on her trusty bicycle, Gladys, to deliver a message to a reclusive wood-carver. Finding the front door ajar, Flavia enters and stumbles upon the poor man’s body hanging upside down on the back of his bedroom door. The only living creature in the house is a feline that shows little interest in the disturbing scene. Curiosity may not kill this cat, but Flavia is energized at the prospect of a new investigation. It’s amazing what the discovery of a corpse can do for one’s spirits. But what awaits Flavia will shake her to the very core.

What I liked: Flavia is her usual, enjoyable self, even after eight books. Bradley has a good end to the murder mystery. Why he ended the book (not the mystery itself) is a big question, but I’m not going to discuss that so I don’t give it away. I listened to part of this (with the talented Jayne Entwistle as narrator, as usual) and read part, which confirmed that listening is more enjoyable to me. I also notice I miss less or remember more (not sure which) with audio.

What I didn’t like: This wasn’t my favorite Flavia story. It didn’t seem quite as tightly written – meaning there were things in the book I didn’t know why Bradley put it in and some odd things with the writing. For example – Flavia meets a significant character (a stranger to her) and Bradley doesn’t fully describe what he looks like until she meets him (Hillary) the second time. And when she meets him the first time, she ends up rubbing his shoulders. This seems out of character and in addition, an odd thing to do to a stranger. Another odd addition is the Horn Dance that apparently happens in town each year. It just seemed like it was stuck in there just so a character can sing at it (the reasoning of which is part of the plot). I assume Bradley didn’t tell the reader why Flavia was ejected from Miss Bodycote’s Female Academy in Canada because he’s mention this more in the next book, but it was something that felt was missing, along with the secret organization (forget the name) and what that groups goal/work is, which I thought would be discussed. I thought that was a line in his other books that he was working toward, but not with this book.

Rating: 3.5/5  As I said, not my favorite Flavia novel but still entertaining. From the ending, Bradley’s obviously going to write another one.

Old Tune Tuesday – Love Me Do (of course)

So it’s Valentine’s Day Image result for heart imageand I wanted an appropriate tune for the day. “Love Me Do” popped into my head. This isn’t the best recording but you get to see their first album cover – you know, for those round, vinyl, black things with the groves in it ;).

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Published in: on February 14, 2017 at 11:26pm02  Leave a Comment  
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Old Tune Tuesday – Roberta Flack

I heard this recently and thought you-all might enjoy it.

Great song. Great singer.

Published in: on January 31, 2017 at 11:26pm01  Leave a Comment  
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Transition to Murder by Renee James

I am pleased to introduce to you all Renee James, an author I met at aWisconsin Writer’s Association writing retreat I was speaking at last year. Renee and I exchanged books. I read Transition to Murder and I would recommend it, but I’ll let Renee talk about the book and a bit about herself.

Transition to Murder (A Bobbi Logan Crime Novel)

You write in the voice of a transgender woman—what’s your connection to the trans world?
I’m transgender, but not transsexual. I identify as a woman but live in both genders for many, many reasons. Lots of us in the transgender spectrum don’t transition for fear of alienating loved ones, losing careers, or, in the case of male-to-female trans people, losing male privilege.

How are you connected to the heroine, Bobbi Logan?
I developed the Bobbi Logan character after I decided not to transition. As a kind of therapy, I began writing a fictional journal about a trans person who transitioned in her late thirties as I might have done. I did the journal to see what her life would have been like. She had many of my physical and emotional characteristics at the start, but she evolved from there. I got about 50,000 words into the project and realized I had a really interesting character, so I decided to put her in a novel.

Transition to Murder is set in 2003 and Bobbi faced enormous difficulties in her transition. Have things changed since then?
It depends on where you live. In the big cities, especially in the north, it’s like night and day. In 2003, when a transwoman like me walked into a restaurant, conversations would stop, people would gawk, and even the people who accepted me would regard me with knowing smiles. Today, in those same places, no one gives me a second glance, the wait staff treats me like anyone else, and genetic women don’t even blink when we share the Ladies Room. It’s as close to a miracle as I’ve seen in my life.

Unfortunately, it’s not quite as positive when you travel into rural areas or the poor sections of big cities or the states of the old Confederacy, where things remain very touchy for trans people.

What about the bathroom issue?
It’s a non-issue in places like Chicago and New York. I think I’ll wait awhile before I go to North Carolina or Texas, though.

Bobbi encounters conflicts and tensions within the transgender community too. Don’t you tend to support each other?Support was always the mantra when I came out, and in the bad old days, we did band together to have functions where it was safe to be “out.” Support isn’t the same as friendship, though, and it wasn’t especially easy to make friends with other trans people. Most of us didn’t have much in common other than being trans, so conversation didn’t necessarily come easily.

Today, more of us are out on our own because it’s safe and fairly accepted in many places, so our cohesiveness is declining. The other factor is age: young transgender people have a radically different experience than trans people my age had in their formative years. They are more out, more accepted, and better able to transition before they become fully formed in wrong gender. So they tend to be much more passable than many of us older trans people, and maybe a little embarrassed at being compared to us. Add to that the usual tension between generations, and you can see the basis for internal friction.

The other thing is, we’re a lot like any other group in America. The same mix of personalities, politics, religious beliefs, education—everything. And you’ve probably noticed that we American’s have a lot of conflicts and tensions these days.

Why do you write in first person?
The people who mentored me when I came out constantly emphasized how important it was for each one of us to make a contribution to the acceptance of transgender people by the rest of society.

I wanted my Bobbi Logan novels to be my contribution. My idea was to put non-trans readers in in the mind and body of a transsexual woman for a few hours so they could get a sense of who we are and how we experience the world. I thought first-person was the best way to go about it and I think it works.

Transition to Murder is based on an earlier book, Coming Out Can Be Murder, which you self-published. What’s the difference between the two books, and why did you re-publish?
I re-published because I wanted to see what I could learn from a professional publisher and to hopefully sell more books than I did as a self-publisher. I got to work with a good editor, and he convinced me to change the ending of the story. That was the biggest difference between the two versions, and the sequels are based on the Transition to Murder version. (Anyone who read Coming Out Can Be Murder and wants to know the change can contact me through my web site (reneejames.author.com).

Tell me about the sequels to Transition to Murder.
First of all, I don’t like multi-book series based on the same hero or heroine because there’s no character development, just plot. So I’ve spaced my sequels years apart, picking up Bobbi’s life at different stages of her development as a woman and a human being.

Transition to Murder is about her first year of gender transition. A Kind of Justice which came out last October, starts five years later. Bobbi is wildly successful and starting to explore all the possibilities of life, including romance, when the Great Recession knocks her flat and a brilliant police detective starts building a powerful case against her for the ritual murder of a sexual predator.

Seven Suspects will release next October. We pick up Bobbi’s life five years after A Kind of Justice when she’s a little world-weary and maybe a trifle arrogant and suddenly finds out she has a stalker who is getting closer and more violent every day.

What are you working on now?
I’m researching ideas for another Bobbi Logan novel, which gives me a great excuse to visit LGBT strongholds and friends. While that’s going on, I’m also working on a thriller with a completely different cast of characters set in Ontario’s famous canoe wilderness, Quetico Provincial Park.

Thanks for visiting my blog, Renee and I wish you the best in your writing career!

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You can get to Renee’s website from Here.

She is on twitter: @ReneeJAuthor

She is on facebook: https://www.facebook.com/reneejamesauthor

You can purchase Transition to Murder on Amazon.

Published in: on January 29, 2017 at 11:26pm01  Comments (2)  

Photo (Video) Phriday

I say this and thought I’d do a video vs photo Phriday. I think this is too funny. Apparently the bird is a Blue Manakin. I wonder why they are doing this. Is the bird (light green and hard to see) sitting at the top of the branch directing them?! Is it watching because it can’t believe they keep doing the same thing over and over again?! Well, I looked them up and, of course, it’s males, trying to get the attention of the female. These birds can be found in Argentina, Brazil and Paraquay.

Published in: on January 27, 2017 at 11:26pm01  Leave a Comment  
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To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

To Kill a MockingbirdI am working on book II of my Agnes Kelly Series and someone had compared Agnes (in the first book) to Scout in To Kill a Mocking Bird. I thought that was an apt description so I wanted to reacquaint myself with the famous story and character. I took the audio book of Harper Lee’s classic out of the library and listened to it. I have not read Lee’s Go Set a Watchman but I will, even though it hasn’t gotten the best reviews.

Stats: First published in 1960, print is 324 pages, audio is 9′, narrated by Roses Prichard

Blurb: (Goodreads) Compassionate, dramatic, and deeply moving, To Kill A Mockingbird takes readers to the roots of human behavior – to innocence and experience, kindness and cruelty, love and hatred, humor and pathos.
(Cliffnotes) To Kill a Mockingbird is primarily a novel about growing up under extraordinary circumstances in the 1930s in the Southern United States. The story covers a span of three years, during which the main characters undergo significant changes. Scout Finch lives with her brother Jem and their father Atticus in the fictitious town of Maycomb, Alabama. Maycomb is a small, close-knit town, and every family has its social station depending on where they live, who their parents are, and how long their ancestors have lived in Maycomb.

A widower, Atticus raises his children by himself, with the help of kindly neighbors and a black housekeeper named Calpurnia. Scout and Jem almost instinctively understand the complexities and machinations of their neighborhood and town. The only neighbor who puzzles them is the mysterious Arthur Radley, nicknamed Boo, who never comes outside. When Dill, another neighbor’s nephew, starts spending summers in Maycomb, the three children begin an obsessive — and sometimes perilous — quest to lure Boo outside.

What I liked: Roses Prichard does a wonderful job with her narration. She is the perfect Scout, making you feel like she’s right there telling you her family’s story. Much has been said about this story and I’ve read it before, of course, but listening to it as a writer vs a reader I think it is a story of a time in history and the lives in this small southern town that Lee captures so well. Everyone remembers the high points: the trial, Boo Radley, but there are many other slower moments that illustrate the everyday lives of these characters.

What I didn’t like: When the book first came out, I wonder if anyone criticized Lee for the large words Scout uses throughout the book. As an adult, it’s entertaining to hear Scout use these words, but as a practical point, I’m not sure a six-year-old would have really known half of them. I understand her father had been reading and instructing her way before she started school, but still… The Cliffnotes explanation is that Scout is older when she’s recounting the story, but it’s not written from an adult perspective, so I don’t buy that.

Rating: 4+/5

Published in: on January 23, 2017 at 11:26pm01  Leave a Comment  
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Old Tune Tuesday – by Train

Okay, this is not that old (unless you think 2012 is old), but I like it (great song, great lyrics, funny video…) so I’m sharing it this on a very gloomy day in Wisconsin. I needed a pick me up – how about you?!

 

Published in: on January 17, 2017 at 11:26pm01  Comments (2)  
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Free Speech Tested by Simon and Schuster

Drew Angerer/Getty Images from npr website

Did anyone hear this piece on NPR recently about a book by social media provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos?:               https://www.npr.org/player/embed/509497010/509542890

It’s an interesting topic of conversation, in particular for all writers and readers out there. Does anyone have the right to promote hate speech? Is it right for Simon and Schuster to promote it by publishing this book (and profit from it)?

Ah…the democratic process in motion.

Published in: on January 13, 2017 at 11:26pm01  Comments (7)  
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